genderqueer

beyond the binaries

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Profile: Mike/Mia — Genderfork
[Image description: Person with medium length brown hair pulled back in a hairclip on one side, wearing a white shirt and a grey-and-white striped scarf.]
You can call me… Mike, Mia, or just M works. It depends on who is present at the time.
I identify as… Bigender. Two halves of a whole. Two  souls in one body: one the monotonous and seemingly straight-laced male I  grew up being, and the other the coy, fun-loving but somewhat bitchy  lesbian who I’ve recently come to terms with. (Mia’s been rubbing off on  Mike lately, though, with positive results.)
As far as third-person pronouns go, … together we prefer plural “they,” but separately, we like our respective gender pronouns. Mike is male, Mia is female.
I’m attracted to…  The lifestyle, the scene, the  community. All things genderqueer have come into focus, and it’s  something we’d never want to let go of. Intelligence, creativity, being  slightly outside the norms of conventional societal structure… artists,  writers, dancers, activists, anyone with passion about what they do.
When people talk about me, I want them to…  realize  that there’s more to a person than how they present themselves; that  just because I may seem like a normal trans-supporter cis guy on the  outside doesn’t mean that is the extent of my personality. There’s  another side to everyone; mine just happens to be someone else entirely.  We aren’t just differentiated by our genders.
I want people to understand…  that Mia isn’t a  figment of my imagination or some psychotic episode. That even when I’m  in control she’s listening, and she’s really sensitive underneath her  hard exterior. I’ve come to love her like a sister, and the more she  develops the more protective I am of her. Integrating her into me would  be like killing her, and I never want to do that. Besides, we’re both  having a lot of fun.
About Mike/Mia Mike is a photography student who grew up in New York before going to  Chicago. Never identifying with cis male culture (or gay male culture  for that matter) yet interested in women, he thoughts turned to the  lesbian community, but he had no way of expressing interest in this  area. Later when a friend became trans, the trans and queer community  opened up, and new insight revealed a comfortable niche to inhabit. 
With the suggestion of “maybe you’re a lesbian” having time to  germinate in his head, Dissociative Identity Disorder soon set in.  Mia  was born as an alternate personality, followed by the discovery of the  Bigender identifier that they now use to describe themselves. The two  are firmly different people, despite residing in the same body, and are  now looking for a comfortable middle-ground for the both of them.
Mia doesn’t get out as often as she likes, especially when  we’re at home for the holidays (like now). Most of the time this results  in her getting bored and posting to our blog, which can provide more  insight into our inner workings:
mpalla.livejournal.com

Profile: Mike/Mia — Genderfork

[Image description: Person with medium length brown hair pulled back in a hairclip on one side, wearing a white shirt and a grey-and-white striped scarf.]

You can call me… Mike, Mia, or just M works. It depends on who is present at the time.

I identify as… Bigender. Two halves of a whole. Two souls in one body: one the monotonous and seemingly straight-laced male I grew up being, and the other the coy, fun-loving but somewhat bitchy lesbian who I’ve recently come to terms with. (Mia’s been rubbing off on Mike lately, though, with positive results.)

As far as third-person pronouns go, … together we prefer plural “they,” but separately, we like our respective gender pronouns. Mike is male, Mia is female.

I’m attracted to… The lifestyle, the scene, the community. All things genderqueer have come into focus, and it’s something we’d never want to let go of. Intelligence, creativity, being slightly outside the norms of conventional societal structure… artists, writers, dancers, activists, anyone with passion about what they do.

When people talk about me, I want them to… realize that there’s more to a person than how they present themselves; that just because I may seem like a normal trans-supporter cis guy on the outside doesn’t mean that is the extent of my personality. There’s another side to everyone; mine just happens to be someone else entirely. We aren’t just differentiated by our genders.

I want people to understand… that Mia isn’t a figment of my imagination or some psychotic episode. That even when I’m in control she’s listening, and she’s really sensitive underneath her hard exterior. I’ve come to love her like a sister, and the more she develops the more protective I am of her. Integrating her into me would be like killing her, and I never want to do that. Besides, we’re both having a lot of fun.

About Mike/Mia
Mike is a photography student who grew up in New York before going to Chicago. Never identifying with cis male culture (or gay male culture for that matter) yet interested in women, he thoughts turned to the lesbian community, but he had no way of expressing interest in this area. Later when a friend became trans, the trans and queer community opened up, and new insight revealed a comfortable niche to inhabit.

With the suggestion of “maybe you’re a lesbian” having time to germinate in his head, Dissociative Identity Disorder soon set in.  Mia was born as an alternate personality, followed by the discovery of the Bigender identifier that they now use to describe themselves. The two are firmly different people, despite residing in the same body, and are now looking for a comfortable middle-ground for the both of them.

Mia doesn’t get out as often as she likes, especially when we’re at home for the holidays (like now). Most of the time this results in her getting bored and posting to our blog, which can provide more insight into our inner workings:

mpalla.livejournal.com

Filed under genderfork profile bigender

  1. dualpaperbags reblogged this from genderqueer and added:
    WHAT WOAH THIS WAS POSTED?! WHY DIDN’T ANY OF YOU TELL ME :U
  2. anonomyss reblogged this from genderqueer and added:
    yes thank you male lesbians!
  3. lookatthisbeautifuldisaster reblogged this from genderqueer
  4. genderqueer posted this