genderqueer

beyond the binaries

Posts tagged MOC

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New health guide released for transgender men and masculine-identified women of color

cassket:

The Brown Boi Project has just released Freeing Ourselves, a new health guide for transgender men and masculine-identified women of color:

Freeing Ourselves: A Guide to Health and Self Love for Brown Boisserves as an exciting new tool for empowerment, as transgender men and women on the masculine spectrum continue to face a health sector in which they are largely invisible. For people of color in these communities, who are often uninsured, these challenges are often compounded; high levels of unemployment, discrimination in public service delivery, and income inequality are the norm, not the exception.

It’s no news that LGBT people of color are incredibly marginalized when it comes to access to competent and affordable health care. I don’t doubt this guide will a much-needed tool for this community to advocate for their health and well-being — and in a personal and empowering way.

(via )

Filed under health resource guide poc moc boi

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fuckyeahftmsofcolor:

It Gets Messy in Here

This is a trailer from my 30-minute film. This short doc challenges gender assumptions and gender identities of all kinds by delving into the bathroom experiences of masculine identified queer women and transgendered men of color, featuring performance artist D’Lo, Alice Y. Hom, Prentis Hemphil, Megan Benton, Dr. C. RIley Snorton, Jun-Fung Chueh-Mejia, jay-Marie Hill, and Che.

(via bbh’s facebook)

Filed under bathroom moc qtpoc qwoc restroom tpoc trailer video boi

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fuckyeahftmsofcolor:

A great video by Michael in response to the anti-trans butch blog that’s going around:

This is my letter to transbashing butch feminists in particular:

I think you and I have a lot in common
We were most likely masculine growing up
To be socialized as a female was to be threatened by parents, teachers, caregivers, and other authority figures for failing to perform femininity
To be masculine in a woman’s body is almost impossible in a patriarchical society that’s scared of strong women
Name calling, physical violence, emotional abuse, threats, and endless taunting are a few of the things both of us have been through
You and I share much of the same emotional knowledge
We have felt the same shame and the same pride
If we took time to understand each other, we could actually effect change

Instead we use the amazing resource of the internet to bash each other
We tell trans men that they look like they have Down Syndrome and will most certainly get cancer from taking testosterone
That they mutilate themselves because they are ashamed of their bodies
That all lesbians should turn their backs on trans men
That all trans men are misogynists and seek to humiliate, weaken, abuse and rape women
You sound so much like the people who held us down for our masculine traits growing up
When you address trans men, you use a capital Y for You
You address us as a mass of people rather than individuals
Rather than try to understand us, you immediately attack with blogs, videos, picture collages and words that are violently offensive
You steal our videos and pictures, take them out of context, add in your personal bias, and display them for the world
You turn a moment of doubt or confusion into an obvious testimonial to how unhealthy a trans life is
I believe you have had doubt or confusion in your life, probably many times
You and I have a lot in common

I want you to  that I accept your butch identity with love and enthusiasm
I have not given up my butch friends to transition and they have not turned their backs on me
I celebrate them for being strong masculine women in a society that is threatened by them and answers that fear with abuse
They celebrate me by acknowledging the reality of being trans and knowing the difference
They celebrate me for being a strong trans man in a society that does not appreciate self-exploration, gender variance, or moving outside the boundary of “normal”
I have a lot in common with my butch friends
When we come together, I believe we can effect change
And I believe we already have

The people that seek to hold the LGBTQ community down are delighted when we fight amongst each other
They want us to waste our time hating each other
They want us to tear each other down with abuse
The weaker we are, the less work they have to do to keep the laws and legislation in place to deny us equal rights
While we fight, they work to keep us in our place
It takes so much time to hate
Especially to publicize that hate in such detail on the internet
Let’s do each other, ourselves, and the world a favor and use that time to do something positive
Work in a soup kitchen, write your local government officials a letter about an issue you want to change, volunteer at a hospital
Rather than tear a community down, enhance a community that you love and support

You don’t have to love and support me
You don’t even have to understand me
I simply want you to know that when you are ready, we can have an adult conversation
We can show mutual respect and, if the conversation reaches a dead end, agree to disagree
I am not threatened by you or your identity for one simple reason:
I’m secure in mine

Filed under video transphobia community transmasculinity MOC

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curate:

“When I’m in L.A., I’m not a AG. In LA., I’m a stud. In the Bay, I’m  still a stud, sorta. In circles where there are elders, it’s butch. If  it’s primarily a white circle, it’s butch. I don’t even like to call  myself a lesbian because I feel like it’s politicized. Well, I could be.  Some people think I’m a lesbian. It’s a fair assumption. I like women.
“I  do this work as a way of rebuilding myself. Because I have the access,  the privilege and the brain space to try and manage it. I float. I  float. And I’m sort of a chameleon so I tend to use the language of the  people that I’m speaking with. Code switching is what they call it.”
Queer Oakland: The Phenomenon that is Krys Freeman | Oakland Local

A few more excerpts:
“I wanted to build a bridge between MOC [masculine of center] women and trans men. There’s so  much that is similar about our identity, but I was hearing a lot of  negativity between the two groups,” s/he continued. “That troubles me,  because in the outside world … people don’t see any difference between  butch women and trans men (if they can tell). We need to know more about  each other. We need to know how to engage each other, in a way that’s  not confrontational.”
“Who’s more masculine, who’s more feminine? These are static ways of  looking at people,” S/he said with a sigh. “Many women have this idea,  ‘because I’m a feminist and I’m butch, a trans man’s choice to modify  how he walks in the world is wrong.’ I know a lot of trans men who are  feminist. I think that feminism is about affirming our right to hold  space in the way that we see fit. It seems counter to that motif … for  feminists to critique a trans man, for how he walks in the world.”
Freeman  also has encountered MOC women who get flustered and offended by being  called “he,” and who blame the mis-perception on transgendered people. “If  you understand it better, maybe that will make you less adverse. Maybe  you’ll be able to take it from a space of conflict, to a teaching. ‘No,  that’s not my identity, but here’s what you might want to know about  it.’ Or, ‘No, I’m not trans, but these are my brothers. I’m not trans,  but there’s nothing wrong with being trans.’ That’s what I want …  dialogue.”

curate:

“When I’m in L.A., I’m not a AG. In LA., I’m a stud. In the Bay, I’m still a stud, sorta. In circles where there are elders, it’s butch. If it’s primarily a white circle, it’s butch. I don’t even like to call myself a lesbian because I feel like it’s politicized. Well, I could be. Some people think I’m a lesbian. It’s a fair assumption. I like women.

“I do this work as a way of rebuilding myself. Because I have the access, the privilege and the brain space to try and manage it. I float. I float. And I’m sort of a chameleon so I tend to use the language of the people that I’m speaking with. Code switching is what they call it.”

Queer Oakland: The Phenomenon that is Krys Freeman | Oakland Local

A few more excerpts:

I wanted to build a bridge between MOC [masculine of center] women and trans men. There’s so much that is similar about our identity, but I was hearing a lot of negativity between the two groups,” s/he continued. “That troubles me, because in the outside world … people don’t see any difference between butch women and trans men (if they can tell). We need to know more about each other. We need to know how to engage each other, in a way that’s not confrontational.”

“Who’s more masculine, who’s more feminine? These are static ways of looking at people,” S/he said with a sigh. “Many women have this idea, ‘because I’m a feminist and I’m butch, a trans man’s choice to modify how he walks in the world is wrong.’ I know a lot of trans men who are feminist. I think that feminism is about affirming our right to hold space in the way that we see fit. It seems counter to that motif … for feminists to critique a trans man, for how he walks in the world.”

Freeman also has encountered MOC women who get flustered and offended by being called “he,” and who blame the mis-perception on transgendered people. “If you understand it better, maybe that will make you less adverse. Maybe you’ll be able to take it from a space of conflict, to a teaching. ‘No, that’s not my identity, but here’s what you might want to know about it.’ Or, ‘No, I’m not trans, but these are my brothers. I’m not trans, but there’s nothing wrong with being trans.’ That’s what I want … dialogue.”

Filed under MOC community interview poc transmasculine