genderqueer

beyond the binaries

Posts tagged activism

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pansexualpride:

Reteaching Gender and Sexuality: Queer/Trans Youth Speak Up

Our current project Reteaching Gender & Sexuality is a message about queer youth action and resilience. The video was generated to contribute additional queer/trans youth voices to the national conversations about queer/trans youth lives. Reteaching Gender & Sexuality intends to steer the conversation beyond the symptom of bullying, to consider systemic issues and deeper beliefs about gender and sexuality that impact queer youth. We invite you to share the video with your friends, family and networks…

for more about the project, the full length documentary, or to check out their resources, go to putthisonthemap.org!

You rock, kids!

I’m not interested in my community just surviving. I want us to be thriving!

Filed under video youth activism project education

74 notes

The job of the gay community is not to deal with extremists who would castigate us or put us on an island and drop an H-bomb on us. The fact of the matter is that there is a small percentage of people in America who understand the true nature of the homosexual community. There is another small percentage who will never understand us. Our job is not to get those people who dislike us to love us. Nor was our aim in the civil rights movement to get prejudiced white people to love us. Our aim was to try to create the kind of America, legislatively, morally, and psychologically, such that even though some whites continued to hate us, they could not openly manifest that hate. That’s our job today: to control the extent to which people can publicly manifest antigay sentiment.
Bayard Rustin (civil rights activist and gay man who advised MLKjr and organized the 1963 March on Washington)

(Source: )

Filed under quote Bayard Rustin gay rights human rights activism poc

56 notes

beaverfuzz:

Day eighty-three 
I was asked by a friend to participate in her women’s culture & society class project. The project is rooted from/based on the “A Series of Questions” project by L. Wiengarten. I also needed to provide a response to the question so here it is:
The easy way out of queer oppression would be to do nothing about it—staying  burdened and continuing to be the governed body that is treated like a single grain of sand in the Sahara desert. Living, breathing, speaking with an angry heart against the unjust, heterosexist society would be the only way I’d  want it even if there are “easier” alternatives. While the world expects us to be muzzled and trained: I’ll keep making it harder on myself, I’ll keep barking.

beaverfuzz:

Day eighty-three

I was asked by a friend to participate in her women’s culture & society class project. The project is rooted from/based on the “A Series of Questions” project by L. Wiengarten. I also needed to provide a response to the question so here it is:

The easy way out of queer oppression would be to do nothing about it—staying  burdened and continuing to be the governed body that is treated like a single grain of sand in the Sahara desert. Living, breathing, speaking with an angry heart against the unjust, heterosexist society would be the only way I’d  want it even if there are “easier” alternatives. While the world expects us to be muzzled and trained: I’ll keep making it harder on myself, I’ll keep barking.

Filed under activism queer

1,086 notes

You get so tired. You get so sick of the homophobia, the sexism, the culture of rape jokes and wife beating cartoons. But today you can take 30 seconds and smile. Somewhere right now there is a daddy dancing along while his femmy boy sings Lady Gaga. Somewhere right now there is a little girl suiting up to go play football with her peewee team. Somewhere there is a woman taking off the clothes she hates and pulling on a pair of pants. And there are boys holding hands in front of Dairy Queen and there are girls on their first date at the mall. There is a mom driving her son to the court so he can change his name from Brittney to Brandon. There is a family supporting their daughter after she reveals sexual abuse. There is a foster parent hesitantly walking into his first PFLAG meeting. And there exists more freedom, more equality, more safety than has ever existed before in the history of humanity. Of course it’s not enough. But it is amazing just the same. And you have done this. This did not happen despite our tears and our sweat, our humiliation and betrayal. This happened because of it.

Keep fighting.

Keep being that “annoying” dude pointing out every sexist remark.

Keep voting.

Keep protesting.

And don’t you EVER let the other side get you down. They know that wearing you out is all they have left. What they do not know is that because of you, their children are safer. Because of you, our schools talk about bullying. Because of you, sexual harassment is illegal at their place of business.

you’re doing it right.

(via ihatethismess) (via midnightsnak, mind-like-a-garden)

Filed under inspiration activism

30 notes

fuckyeahtrannies:

jumpfightgo:

Great speech from Harvey Milk Day rally in Boston - I love how Nancy articulates that transgender rights are not “special rights”. Trans activists are leading the way and we all stand to benefit.  

The transgender community and the transgender movement is the bleeding edge of gender reform in our culture. We are the lightning rods who catch hell for other peoples’ gender discomfort.

And that’s why more and more people who do not identify as transgender themselves are taking up our cause, because they recognize that this is about the gender discomfort that average people in our culture suffer every day.

Yes this is about transgender rights, absolutely, but it’s about everybody’s gender rights.

Well said Nancy.

Filed under trans activism gender speech

9 notes

fuckyeahtrannies:

daikujapan:

An Interview with transgender Setagaya Assembly member Aya Kamikawa

In this video interview with TokyoWrestling.com, Aya Kamikawa discusses her experience negotiating LGBT rights in Japanese politics.  She touches on the relationship between LGBT “tolerance” and economic trends in the country, and highlights her efforts to make changes in such areas as school bullying and mis-education about queer sexualities.  Finally, she addresses a divide that continues to permeate Japanese lesbian communities: the divide between those who want to find a way to live their identities privately and affirmatively, and those who see their identity as a political stepping stone.  Aya Kamikawa’s response is that, as LGBT people, Japanese queers need to speak out about their rights in order for society to “catch up with us.”

http://www.tokyowrestling.com/articles_eg/2009/12/2009_tokyo_pride_festival_3.html

Aya Kamikawa speaks in a way different from many of today’s politicians: she reminds us to thank our representatives from our hearts when they make the right decision. From the above link:

In 2003, after announcing her candidacy for the Setagaya Ward Assembly, Aya Kamikawa became the first openly transgender person to ever run for public office in Japan. Though new to politics, Kamikawa’s bold, positive approach and personal experience led her to a successful win in the election, where she placed sixth among 72 candidates vying to fill several Assembly seats.

Filed under Japan activism lgbt politics transgender transgender Asia trans politician

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Stop Trans Pathologization: Manifesto

The advocates and groups who sign this document, and are part of the International Network for Trans’ Identities’ Despathologization, publicly denounce once again the psychiatrization of our identities and the serious consequences of the so called “Gender or Sex Identity Disorder” (GID). In the same way, we want to make visible the violence done to intersex people throughout the current medical procedures.

With “psychiatrization” we name the practice of defining and treating transexuality under a mentally disordered label. We are also speaking about the mistaking of non normative bodies and identities (those out of the cultural dominant order) for pathological bodies and identities.

Psychiatrization gives the medical-psychiatric institutions the control over gender identities. The official practice of these institutions, motivated through state, religious, economical and political interests, reflects and reproduces the male/female binomial on people’s bodies. Making believe this exclusive position is a “true” and natural one.

This binomial [binary], supposes the solely existence of two bodies (male or female), and associates a determined behavior to each one of them (male or female). At the same time it has traditionally taken into consideration heterosexuality as the only possible relationship between them. Today, as we denounce this paradigm, which has justified the current social order with nature and biological arguments, we evidence its social effects so as to put and end to its political pretentions.

(Read on)

Filed under trans transgender intersex pathologization depathologization activism politics

15 notes

Protest - Cape Town. Conviction of Malawi “gay” couple

South African activists protest the arrest, in Malawi, of a couple that was arrested under charges of “male homosexuality”. One of the partners -assigned male at birth- actually identifies as a woman.

"The group of activists urged the SA government to negotiate the release of the couple and to offer them asylum in South Africa. The group also demanded that the SA government end the continued silence about human rights abuses against sexual minorities on the rest of the continent." (more here)

Beautiful protest. Fight on!

Filed under Africa Malawi South Africa activism protest rights trans transgender human rights

19 notes

Kenya gays demand recognition

pansexualpride:

Scores of Kenya homosexuals celebrated the International Day Against Homophobia in style Monday and demanded for more recognition.

The Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender and Intersex (LGBIT) persons wined, sung and danced and for the first time allowed media coverage of their function to fight stigma and victimisation associated with their sexual orientation.

“Ten years ago there was no public place that could have hosted such a function,” Kenya Human Rights Commission director Muthoni Wanyeki, whose lobby organised the event at the National Museums of Kenya, said.

“Although the Committee of Experts did not allow same sex marriage in Kenya. The Proposed Constitution would enable all Kenyans access health and are free from discrimination and violence. The basic rights are for all Kenyans including people from the gay community.”

Ms Wanyeki, however, said despite the government allowing the gay community to meet the battle against harassment of and violence against sexual minorities is still on. (read more)

Filed under gay rights activism Kenya Africa lgbt